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Our latest news




Translation tech gets Olympic push

Japan may not be the best in the world when it comes to speaking English, but it remains a pioneer in developing cutting-edge translation technology.
With the 2020 Tokyo Olympics approaching, the nation is once again plotting to surprise the world, this time with high-quality, real-time machine translation systems.
Public and private institutions are working eagerly to develop and upgrade the technology so it can easily be used by tourists, whose numbers are growing sharply

Preparing for Machine Translation: What Machines Can and Can`t Do

There is nothing especially novel about machine translation, a technology that reaches back to 1951, when a team from IBM and Georgetown University first demonstrated a computer’s ability to translate short phrases from English into Russian. In 63 years, the machines involved in machine translation have evolved. What a warehouse-sized computer could do in 1951, a laptop can do even better today.

The greatest mistranslations ever

Google Translate’s latest update – turning the app into a real-time interpreter – has been heralded as bringing us closer to ‘a world where language is no longer a barrier’. Despite glitches, it offers a glimpse of a future in which there are no linguistic misunderstandings – especially ones that change the course of history.

Google Translate `turns interpreter` with voice function

Google says its Translate app can now act as an interpreter, with the addition of a real-time voice-translation mode.
It said the updated app would automatically recognise languages being spoken and translate them.

Tech is removing language barriers

When Google Translate was launched in 2006, basing translations on hundreds of millions of online texts, it raised a crucial question for the industry: will technology take over?

This human-powered SMS translator requires no app and no smartphone

Muuzii allows North American users to translate words and phrases from different languages within seconds using their mobile phones. It's not an app, and you don't have to own a smartphone to use it.

Bing Translator vs Google Translate – The right text for the right tool

Does the use of free translation tools immediately mean decreased quality, even in the year 2014 when technologies develop and the language industry grows online faster than ever?

Lexifone 2 released – translate phone calls to another language

Lexifone, the world leader in automated multi-language speech translation, today announced Lexifone 2, the first phone service equipped with the ability to translate nearly every major language, now in real-time.

Why Machines Alone Cannot Solve the World`s Translation Problem

Sixty years ago this week, scientists at Georgetown and IBM lauded their machine translation solution known as the 701 computer. The computer had successfully translated multiple sentences from Russian into English, leading the researchers to confidently claim that translation would be fully handled by machines in "the next few years."

The silent revolution: Cloud-based translation management systems

Have you ever day-dreamed about a translation management system (TMS) that provides all its features without the headaches: a TMS that doesn’t conflict with other applications; one that runs smoothly on any system including a Mac; a translation management system that you never have to update; and last but not least, one that doesn’t cost you hundreds of dollars just to get started? If this vaguely describes your vision, I’ve got news for you: This type of translation management system is a reality and has been for a number of years already.
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Our latest news

Translation tech gets Olympic push

Japan may not be the best in the world when it comes to speaking English, but it remains a pioneer in developing cutting-edge translation technology.
With the 2020 Tokyo Olympics approaching, the nation is once again plotting to surprise the world, this time with high-quality, real-time machine translation systems.
Public and private institutions are working eagerly to develop and upgrade the technology so it can easily be used by tourists, whose numbers are growing sharply

Preparing for Machine Translation: What Machines Can and Can't Do

There is nothing especially novel about machine translation, a technology that reaches back to 1951, when a team from IBM and Georgetown University first demonstrated a computer’s ability to translate short phrases from English into Russian. In 63 years, the machines involved in machine translation have evolved. What a warehouse-sized computer could do in 1951, a laptop can do even better today.